Breakout Sessions

2016 Breakout Sessions

Case Study: Using Hospital Data Insights to Improve Clinical Quality at The University of Kansas Hospital and Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center

Wednesday, November 2, 2016 | 2:00 PM–2:45 PM
Mount Vernon Square B

For the past 27 years, U.S. News & World Report has published the annual Best Hospitals rankings. In December 2014, U.S. News introduced the Hospital Data Insights platform in an effort to better understand the data points behind these scores. The HDI analytics suite allows hospital executives to perform much deeper analyses of the more than 12 million metrics underpinning the Best Hospitals and Best Children’s Hospitals rankings.

The Hospital Data Insights team will provide a brief overview of the tools, followed by presentations from Terry Rusconi, Vice President of Performance Improvement at The University of Kansas Hospital, and Jim Papp, Director of External Reporting and Transparency at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. Rusconi and Papp will share examples of how their respective facilities use Hospital Data Insights to analyze quality and safety measures in order to make data-driven decisions to drive clinical care improvements at their hospitals.

Presented by:
hdi-logo-220x76-your-hospital-by-the-numbers

Speakers

  • Evan Jones
    General Manager, Insights Group, U.S. News & World Report
  • Jim Papp
    Director of External Reporting and Transparency, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center
  • Terry Rusconi
    Vice President of Performance Improvement, University of Kansas Hospital

 

Case Study: Bringing Ideas to Life: Creating a Culture of Innovation

Thursday, November 3, 2016 | 8:45 AM–10:00 AM
Mount Vernon Square A

As the nation’s first children’s hospital, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) has been leading innovation in healthcare since 1855. CHOP teams have developed new treatments for the most challenging diseases, pioneered in utero surgical procedures, performed the world’s first bilateral hand transplant on a child, and made countless other breakthroughs that have transformed children’s lives.

In 2015, CHOP created the Office of Entrepreneurship & Innovation (OEI) to continue this tradition of innovation and help staff at all levels of the organization bring their best ideas to life. CHOP recently spun out three stand-alone companies focusing on medical privacy (Haystack Informatics), driving safety (Diagnostic Driving) and pharmaceutical safety (Bainbridge Health), and is developing a number of digital health initiatives, including an app that allows CHOP dermatologists to diagnose and treat patients remotely. The OEI now has relationships with more than 30 external partners that are helping CHOP bring its innovations to market.

In this session, Madeline Bell, CHOP’s president and CEO, and Patrick FitzGerald, CHOP’s vice president for Entrepreneurship & Innovation, will discuss the Hospital’s efforts to foster a culture of innovation.

Presented by:

chop_new_resized

Speakers

  • Madeline Bell
    President and Chief Executive Officer, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
  • Patrick FitzGerald
    Vice President for Entrepreneurship and Innovation, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

 

Hitting the Sweet Spot With Predictive Analytics

Thursday, November 3, 2016 | 8:45 AM–10:00 AM
Meeting Room 4

Better clinical decisions. Reduced chronic care costs. Lower readmissions rates. More effective disease prevention. These are just some of the benefits that predictive modeling offers. By smartly applying data mining and historical trends, hospitals can better allocate resources and design more personalized, effective treatment plans and population health strategies. Yet for these benefits to be realized, hospitals must have the proper infrastructure, staffing, processes, and clinical goals in place so that the right analytics are developed and applied in the most actionable way. Our panel will discuss the best practices and approaches being used by medical centers to harness the power of big data and predictive analytics to help them achieve their missions of delivering quality healthcare at a lower cost.

Brought to you by:
analyticsmd

Moderator: Mudit Garg, Chief Executive Officer and Founder, analyticsMD

Speakers

 

Implementing a Population Health Model

Thursday, November 3, 2016 | 8:45 AM–10:00 AM
Mount Vernon Square B

The transition to a population-health model of care is picking up steam as Medicare moves to tie half of payments to value-based models by 2018. What are the key steps a system must take to make the shift successfully? Executives from institutions that have come farthest down this road will discuss such issues as how best to define and target a population, the mechanisms – from staffing innovations to data systems to hospital-sponsored health plans – needed to track and manage it, and the payer-provider relationships required to make this type of care work.

Brought to you by:
3m

Moderator: Mike Crocker, Director, Integrated Hospital Systems, Bayer HealthCare

Speakers

  • David Carmouche, M.D.
    Senior Vice President and President, Ochsner Health Network, Ochsner Health System
  • Timothy G. Ferris, M.D.
    Senior Vice President of Population Health Management, Partners HealthCare
  • Hon Pak, M.D.
    Chief Medical Officer, 3M Health Information Systems
  • Kristofer L. Smith, M.D.
    Senior Vice President, Population Health Management, Northwell Health
    Medical Director, Northwell Health Solutions

 

Telemedicine Comes of Age

Thursday, November 3, 2016 | 8:45 AM–10:00 AM
Meeting Room 8

From remote patient monitoring and radiology services to virtual doctor visits to full-fledged tele-ICUs, telemedicine may soon be a routine part of healthcare delivery as more hospitals are embracing its cost savings and convenience. Many systems are incorporating telemedicine as a way to connect major hospital centers with regional affiliates, while others are innovating in distinctive ways, such as virtual care centers with no on-site patients. Still, many structural and regulatory hurdles remain – for instance, about 30 states require private insurers to cover telehealth services – and payers and providers alike continue to grapple with questions about reimbursement. In this session, several telemedicine pioneers and experts will discuss best practices and looming obstacles in this avenue of healthcare.

Brought to you by:
nemours_2

Moderator: Angela Haupt, Assistant Managing Editor, Health, U.S. News & World Report

Speakers

  • Gina Altieri
    Enterprise Senior Vice President and Chief of Strategy Integration, Nemours Children’s Health System
  • Randall S. Moore, M.D.
    President, Mercy Virtual
  • Rohit Varma, M.D., MPH
    Interim Dean, Keck School of Medicine
    President, USC Care
    Director, USC Gayle and Edward Roski Eye Institute, University of Southern California
  • Yulun Wang, Ph.D.
    Chairman, Chief Innovation Officer & Founder, InTouch Health

 

Case Study: Healthcare Learning Networks – Tapping the Power of Working Together

Thursday, November 3, 2016 | 10:45 AM–12:00 PM
Mount Vernon Square A

Healthcare systems rely on management approaches and organizational architectures developed during the industrial age, so it’s no wonder that many are finding it difficult to keep pace with today’s dynamic landscape, explosive knowledge growth, and rapid innovation. At the same time, networks are transforming other industries that face similar challenges by building on the science of cooperation, non-market economics, and evolutionary biology. Such self-organizing, complex systems are driving innovation in a variety of fields and can provide a model for how learning networks can transform healthcare. Cincinnati Children’s Anderson Center for Health Systems Excellence is at the forefront of the learning network movement, which is transforming the delivery of care by using big data to mobilize collaboration between patients, families, clinicians, and scientists. The Anderson Center supports networks that bring together patients, clinicians, and health system leaders across 412 care centers at 271 organizations in 43 states, the United Kingdom, and Canada. Working together, these networks have improved remission rates in children with inflammatory bowel disease, reduced mortality in children with complex congenital heart disease, decreased infant mortality, and saved children from harm and medical errors. Join Cincinnati Children’s leaders, along with several patient and parent partners, for an interactive and thought-provoking session about how learning networks in healthcare are harnessing the power of working together to meet the demands of the rapidly changing industry landscape.

Presented by:
Cincinnati Children’s

Speakers

  • Carole Lannon, M.D.
    Director, Learning Networks, James M. Anderson Center for Health Systems Excellence, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center
  • Peter A. Margolis, M.D., Ph.D.
    Co-Director, James M. Anderson Center for Health Systems Excellence, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center
  • Stephen E. Muething, M.D.
    Co-Director, James M. Anderson Center for Health Systems Excellence; Vice President for Safety; Attending Physician, Division of Hospital Medicine, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center

 

Enhancing the Patient Experience

Thursday, November 3, 2016 | 10:45 AM–12:00 PM
Mount Vernon Square B

Since CMS began releasing HCAHPS scores, hospitals have felt growing pressure to ensure a positive care experience for the people passing through their doors. While debate still rages on the importance and validity of different metrics, there is near unanimity on the need to improve patient experience, particularly as hospitals move to a value-based model. Many institutions are hiring patient experience managers to expedite change, investing in technology like iPads for patients and visitors to access their EMRs or to schedule appointments, providing one-stop coordinated care for people with chronic illnesses, and training staff to have a “patient-first” mentality in every interaction. Studies have shown that hospitals that rank in the top tier for patient experience tend to reap other benefits, including higher profitability and lower staff turnover. This session will explore the practices shown to have the greatest impact in increasing patient satisfaction.

Brought to you by:
elsevier_updated_padded

Moderator: Evan Richardson, Senior Vice President, Platform Operations, Grand Rounds

Speakers

  • Greg F. Burke, M.D.
    Chief Patient Experience Officer, Geisinger Health System
  • Rick Evans
    Senior Vice President and Chief Experience Officer, New York-Presbyterian Hospital
  • Sonika Mathur
    Senior Vice President & General Manager, Patient Engagement Solutions, Elsevier

 

Focused Factories: The Advantages of the Specialized Approach

Thursday, November 3, 2016 | 10:45 AM–12:00 PM
Meeting Room 3

Manufacturers from Henry Ford on have long understood the advantages of building expertise around a few select products, services or tasks to improve quality and competitiveness. Increasingly, hospitals and other healthcare centers and systems are adopting these principles as they discover that offering all services to all patients has led to unwanted inefficiencies, higher costs and, in some cases, less than optimal care. This session will explore the advantages of a focused factory approach for managing service lines and improving patient care. Applications can range from facilities creating regional centers of excellence for cancer care or cardiac surgery to an individual hospital reorganizing trauma care so that only a specialized team handles a patient’s needs from admission to discharge. Panelists will examine the benefits and proper application of focused factory models, as well as how specialized approaches can work in tandem with the integrated care needed by certain patients, like the chronically ill, whose treatments and medications must all work in harmony.

Brought to you by:
COH_lockup7

Moderator: Steve Sternberg, Senior Writer, U.S. News & World Report

Speakers

 

Interoperability Progress Report: Building an Effective Health IT Infrastructure

Thursday, November 3, 2016 | 10:45 AM–12:00 PM
Meeting Room 4

The federal government is pushing healthcare providers to make major inroads toward interoperability by the end of 2017, hoping that seamlessly connected health IT systems will translate to superior care and value-based reimbursement. Earlier this year, a host of hospitals, EHR vendors, physician groups, and others pledged to promote access, transparency and shared national standards in their health IT systems. But making these changes isn’t simple, and some providers are finding major cost and logistical barriers to achieving the kind of data sharing desired by ONC. Hear from several healthcare and policy experts about helpful strategies for effective EHR systems and what to expect in the years to come.

Moderator: Avery Comarow, Health Rankings Editor, U.S. News & World Report

Speakers

  • Matthew Chambers
    Chief Information Officer and Vice President, Baylor Scott & White Health
  • Peter D. Stetson, M.D.
    Chief Health Informatics Officer, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
  • Mark A. Weber
    Senior Vice President, Healthcare Development, Infor Healthcare
  • Paul Jonathan White, M.D.
    Deputy National Coordinator, Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology

 

A Package Deal: Laying the Groundwork for Bundled Payments

Thursday, November 3, 2016 | 2:15 PM–3:30 PM
Mount Vernon Square B

CMS has now implemented its Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement Model, requiring hospitals, doctors, and other providers in 67 cities to accept bundled payments for reimbursement of hip and knee replacements. For the first time, this mandatory model is making hospitals financially responsible for the recovery of their patients from 90 days after hospital discharge. Panelists will examine how bundled payments are driving higher quality and more coordinated and efficient care between hospitals, physicians, and post-acute care providers, and they will look down the road at how stakeholders can apply the lessons learned as CMS accelerates its pace in the move toward episode-of-care payments.

Brought to you by:
xg-health-solutions

Moderator: Shannon Muchmore, Policy & Politics Reporter, Modern Healthcare

Speakers

  • Joseph Bosco, M.D.
    Professor, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, NYU Langone Medical Center
    Vice Chair for Clinical Affairs, NYU Langone Medical Center
  • Rocky Edmondson
    Senior Director, Bundled Payment Consulting, xG Health Solutions
  • Christopher Stanley, M.D.
    Vice President, Population Health, Catholic Health Initiatives

 

Breaking the Mold: Fostering In-House Innovation

Thursday, November 3, 2016 | 2:15 PM–3:30 PM
Meeting Room 3

In recent years, dozens of hospitals and health systems have established innovation centers that develop new ideas and products related to patient engagement, emerging technology, and other healthcare issues. In addition to spinning off commercial products and services, such idea accelerators are helping hospitals improve their bottom lines by developing new cost-saving techniques and strategies on both the organizational and clinical fronts. Panelists include leaders of several healthcare innovation centers that have had a real impact on the quality and cost of care.

Brought to you by:
exl-analytics

Moderator: James Nicholls, Managing Director, Fitzroy Health

Speakers

  • Lisa Chancellor
    Vice President and Practice Head for Healthcare Providers, EXL Analytics
  • Todd Dunn
    Director of Innovation; Director, Intermountain Healthcare Transformation Lab, Intermountain Healthcare
  • David R. Rubinow, M.D.
    Director, UNC Innovation and Health Care System Transformation, UNC Health Care
    Assad Meymandi Distinguished Professor and Chair of Psychiatry, UNC School of Medicine
  • Lesley Solomon
    Executive Director, Brigham Innovation Hub, Brigham and Women’s Hospital

 

Case Study: Healthcare Innovation in the Cloud

Thursday, November 3, 2016 | 2:15 PM–3:30 PM
Mount Vernon Square A

The ability to innovate while delivering secure and compliant technologies is the new imperative. Cloud adoption in the healthcare industry is the key to improving patient experiences, boosting care team productivity, managing population wellness, and achieving better quality outcomes at lower costs.

Join thought leaders from Children’s Mercy, Children’s National and UPMC to hear how the industry is transforming healthcare by accelerating and implementing secure cloud solutions–and reinventing how health organizations work today.

Presented by:
microsoft

Moderator: Andrea McGonigle, Managing Director, Health & Life Sciences, Microsoft

Speakers

 

The Medical School Startup: Reshaping Medical Education

Thursday, November 3, 2016 | 2:15 PM–3:30 PM
Meeting Room 8

This summer, students began taking classes at the University of Texas’s Dell Medical School in Austin, where the curriculum features a strong focus on collaboration, student-led projects on redesigning healthcare delivery, and other innovative techniques. UT’s school is one of a host of new institutions cropping up with an eye toward reshaping medical education for a rapidly changing healthcare landscape. Several other cutting-edge medical schools are each seeking to train primary care physicians in heavy demand in their regions and nationally. And Kaiser Permanente is planning its own medical school that will concentrate on training caregivers in new technology, working in nontraditional settings, and more. This session will feature leaders of several emerging medical schools that are creating their curricula from the ground up to better prepare the doctors of tomorrow.

Brought to you by:
Print

Moderator: Anne McGrath, Managing Editor, U.S. News & World Report

Speakers

 

Case Study: Driving Performance in a Patient-Centric Era

Thursday, November 3, 2016 | 4:00 PM–5:15 PM
Mount Vernon Square A

The next era of healthcare will require organizations to drive behavior and performance as they never have previously. From clinical quality to patient access and engagement to physician alignment, providers will need to develop a wide range of new capabilities to succeed. Understanding how to benchmark and improve performance across such strategies will be key to succeeding in a patient-centric world. Join this session to discover how several organizations are using deep data visibility to measure and improve their performance.

Presented by:
athenahealth_web

Moderator: Steve Kahane, M.D., Executive Vice President and President of Client Organization, athenahealth

Speakers

  • Jeff Butler
    Founder & CEO, Privia Health
  • Shaun Ginter
    President and Chief Executive Officer, CareWell Urgent Care
  • Michael Nochomovitz, M.D.
    Senior Vice President, Chief Clinical Integration and Network Development Officer, New York-Presbyterian Healthcare System

 

Re-Engineering the Hospital: Taking a Systems Approach

Thursday, November 3, 2016 | 4:00 PM–5:15 PM
Meeting Room 8

It’s been a decade since the Institute of Medicine and the National Academy of Engineering noted that, in order to improve patient safety and quality of care, systems engineering principles that govern in other arenas from aviation to auto manufacturing to nuclear aircraft carriers would need to be applied in healthcare. But the challenges are great – notably the lack of interoperability of technologies, a payment model that rewards based on volume rather than efficiency and outcomes, and the complexity of care – and progress has been limited. We’ll hear from a few pioneers about the obstacles they faced and lessons learned.

Brought to you by:
kyruus

Moderator: Dennis Weaver, M.D., Chief Medical Officer and Executive Vice President, Advisory Board

Speakers

 

The Community Hospital: A Lesson in Surviving and Thriving

Thursday, November 3, 2016 | 4:00 PM–5:15 PM
Meeting Room 3

In an age of rampant hospital mergers and consolidation, millions of patients still receive care at community and public hospitals. While these institutions often serve high-need populations in urban and rural areas, many of them are struggling to stay open. Indeed, dozens of rural facilities have closed in the last several years, leaving residents with less access to quality care. Still, some institutions are finding ways to adapt by utilizing telehealth, revamping quality and patient safety, building creative community and government partnerships, and more. Hear from the leaders of several public and community hospitals that are thriving at a precarious time for many of their peers.

Moderator: Tim Smart, Executive Editor, U.S. News & World Report

Speakers

 

The Retail Clinic Phenomenon

Thursday, November 3, 2016 | 4:00 PM–5:15 PM
Meeting Room 4

The number of consumer-oriented healthcare clinics is expected to increase dramatically in the coming years as many people see these providers as cheaper and more convenient alternatives to the hospital or physician’s office. Some health systems are creating their own urgent care clinics and even tapping retail providers as partners to step up preventive care and wellness programs. While their overall market share is still small, these clinics are transforming the landscape of care, particularly for vaccines and common conditions. Get an inside look at these emerging models of everyday and urgent care and how the traditional players are responding.

Moderator: Michael Morella, Senior Editor, U.S. News & World Report

Speakers

 

A Roundtable with Regulators

Friday, November 4, 2016 | 8:45 AM–10:00 AM
Meeting Room 4

The federal government has implemented and is experimenting with a number of initiatives that aim to help blaze the path from fee-for-service to value-based care – from ACOs, medical homes, and bundled payments to EMR and interoperability mandates to Medicare incentives and penalties. Join government policymakers and industry experts as they offer a status report on the progress, effectiveness and promise of these models and programs.

Brought to you by:
navigant

Moderator: Kimberly Leonard, Health Care Reporter, U.S. News & World Report

Speakers

  • Grant Barbosa
    Legislative Assistant, Health and Human Resources, Office of Rep. Sander Levin, U.S. House of Representatives
  • Johanna Barraza-Cannon
    Director, Government Healthcare Solutions, Navigant Consulting, Inc.
  • Steven Posnack
    Director, Office of Standards and Technology, Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

 

Case Study: Engaging Patients to Expand Your Market

Friday, November 4, 2016 | 8:45 AM–10:00 AM
Meeting Room 8

As we move to a world of value-based healthcare that leverages reimbursements to achieve improved outcomes, the quality and efficiency of care delivery will be the difference between success and hardship. Equally important, as healthcare providers become financially accountable for the care they provide, external cultural factors and comorbidities that might be beyond a provider’s control will affect payments. Studies show that there is a definitive disparity in the prevalence of such external factors among racial and ethnic minority populations compared to other demographic groups. Helping these patients understand and manage these factors can lead to more efficient episodes of care and better outcomes, particularly for patients who suffer from chronic musculoskeletal conditions. Engaging patients in improving their overall health can lead to a higher quality, more efficient, and less costly experience. Through our Shared Decision Making tool, marginalized patients who might have been turned away by providers in the past become healthier patients who are less likely to experience re-hospitalization and complications. The tool helps patients understand the effects various treatment options can have both medically and financially. When patients comprehend the value of surgical intervention rather than delaying or deferring treatment altogether, they can make more informed choices. Hear from several providers about the demonstrable improvements that Shared Decision Making can deliver.

Presented by:
zimmer

Speakers

  • Ana Bejinez-Eastman, M.D.
    Associate Program Director, PIH Family Practice Residency
    Volunteer Clinical Faculty Family Medicine, University of California Irvine School of Medicine
  • Carla Harwell, M.D.
    Member, Movement is Life Executive Steering Committee
    Associate Professor of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine, Case Western Reserve School of Medicine
    Medical Director, University Hospitals Otis Moss Jr. Health Center
  • Mary I. O’Connor, M.D.
    Chair, Movement is Life Caucus
    Member, Movement is Life Executive Steering Committee
    Director, Center for Musculoskeletal Care at Yale Medicine and Yale New Haven Health
    Professor of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, Yale School of Medicine
  • Michael L. Parks, M.D.
    Member, Movement is Life Executive Steering Committee
    Associate Professor of Clinical Orthopaedic Surgery, Hospital for Special Surgery, Cornell Weill Medical Center

 

Fortifying Against Cyberthreats

Friday, November 4, 2016 | 8:45 AM–10:00 AM
Meeting Room 3

Earlier this year, a California hospital paid a ransom to hackers to regain access to its own EMRs just another sign of the virtual threats faced by the healthcare community. From simple malware infections and network failures to the potential hacking of medical devices, patient portals, EMRs, and mobile apps, the healthcare industry has stamped this issue urgent. Of equal concern is the fact that some intrusions can take months to detect, further magnifying the threat to patient care. Join the discussion to hear about how hospitals and healthcare systems can prioritize and implement systemwide cybersecurity standards and processes to keep pace with the industry’s increasing reliance on technology.

Brought to you by:
armor

Moderator: Frank J. Cilluffo, Associate Vice President and Director, Center for Cyber and Homeland Security, George Washington University

Speakers

 

Pediatric Breakout Sessions

Stepping Up Pediatric Patient Safety

Thursday, November 3, 2016 | 8:45 AM–10:00 AM
Meeting Room 3

To improve patient safety, many healthcare providers are focusing on reducing hospital-acquired conditions, curbing costly readmissions and other adverse events, and promoting an institutional culture of safety that will not only save lives but also reduce costs. The efforts are particularly robust at children’s hospitals, more than 100 of which are part of the Solutions for Patient Safety network, a collective that is aiming to reduce the rate of HACs by 40 percent by year’s end. Nationwide, researchers are examining a number of potential solutions, including common safety triggers in electronic medical records, improving care protocols and post-discharge processes, and making information more transparent to patients and consumers. This session will explore how children’s hospitals in particular are working to create comprehensive safety plans that strengthen quality of care.

Moderator: Kimberly Leonard, Health Care Reporter, U.S. News & World Report

Speakers

  • Meri Armour
    President and Chief Executive Officer, Le Bonheur Children's Hospital
  • Chris J. Dickinson, M.D.
    Chief Medical Officer, C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital, University of Michigan Health System
  • Michael Fisher
    President and Chief Executive Officer, Cincinnati Children's
  • Stephen E. Muething, M.D.
    Co-Director, James M. Anderson Center for Health Systems Excellence; Vice President for Safety; Attending Physician, Division of Hospital Medicine, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center

 

Keeping the Pediatric Population Healthy

Thursday, November 3, 2016 | 10:45 AM–12:00 PM
Meeting Room 8

Pediatric healthcare is gradually moving to a new goal: reducing the population of sick children by focusing on fending off illness and disease. To initiate full-scale prevention, hospitals are developing their own health plans or ACOs to drive better outcomes and impose greater financial responsibility.  They are working with schools, nonprofits, governments, businesses and their peers to spearhead ambitious population health initiatives like reducing asthma and obesity rates or expanding mental health services.  And when the patient can’t get to them, they’re going to the patient with home care units and mobile medical units that target uninsured and homeless teens. This panel will examine how these new models are being applied and their potential to transform pediatric population health over the next decade.

Moderator: Paul Demko, Health Care Reporter, Politico

Speakers

 

A New Blueprint for Children’s Hospitals: Strategic Partnerships

Thursday, November 3, 2016 | 2:15 PM–3:30 PM
Meeting Room 4

Children’s hospitals are tossing out old playbooks and creating new ones to meet the challenges of a rapidly changing healthcare environment and increasing competition. Some leading pediatric institutions serve as hubs for local and regional children’s hospitals that don’t have the expertise or infrastructure to handle complex cases such as heart surgery, for example. Other approaches include partnering with community and county hospitals to offer specialized care on-site or staffing their respective pediatric units; affiliating with adult hospital systems and academic medical centers; investing in pediatric retail or specialty clinics; and seeking out international partnerships. Our panelists will explore these and other collaborative strategies that are changing the face of pediatric care and allowing children’s hospitals to expand their reach to a wider geographic area.

Moderator: Steve Sternberg, Senior Writer, U.S. News & World Report

Speakers

  • Kim Roberts
    Chief Strategy Officer and Chief Administrative Officer of Physician Practices, Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford - Stanford Children's Health
  • Jeff Sperring, M.D.
    Chief Executive Officer, Seattle Children's
  • David Wessel, M.D.
    Executive Vice President and Chief Medical Officer, Hospital and Specialty Services, Children’s National Health System

 

Inside the U.S. News Children’s Hospitals Rankings

Thursday, November 3, 2016 | 4:00 PM–5:15 PM
Mount Vernon Square B

A decade ago, U.S. News and its data contractor, RTI International, embarked on the Best Children’s Hospitals project. What have we learned? What most urgently remains to be done? Join the U.S. News health analysis team and our RTI colleagues as we discuss methodological dilemmas and opportunities, as well as invite feedback from attendees.

Moderator: Ben Harder, Managing Editor and Chief of Health Analysis, U.S. News & World Report

Speakers

 

Charting a New Course in Pediatric Genomic Medicine

Friday, November 4, 2016 | 8:45 AM–10:00 AM
Meeting Room 2

As technology has advanced and costs have come down, more and more children’s hospitals are tapping the power of sophisticated genetic testing as an increasingly routine part of care. Many pediatric institutions have established genomic medicine centers, sometimes in collaboration with adult hospitals or research universities. Such institutions are building sweeping databases of genetic data to more deeply understand the genetics of childhood cancers or rare diseases, for instance, and craft personalized treatment protocols where they can. But much of the territory is still uncharted, and many challenges remain, from hiring more genetic experts to putting in place the proper analytics infrastructure to interpret the data. This session will feature pediatric programs that are ahead of the curve in genomic medicine.

Moderator: Anne McGrath, Managing Editor, U.S. News & World Report

Speakers